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Illinois Just Passed New Gun Bills

Senators green lighted a trio of House proposals that would tighten regulation on semi-automatics and bump stocks in the Land of Lincoln while a promised veto override lingers.

One bill, HB-1468, heads to Gov. Rauner for review and would mandate a 72-hour waiting period for some semi-autos as well as .50 BMG caliber rifles. Current state regulations have a 24-hour wait on longarms, but sponsors of the move argue more time is needed for guns classified as “assault weapons.”

“Increasing the waiting period to obtain an assault weapon ensures sufficient time to complete a background check and increases the ‘cooling off’ period for those who may cause harm to others,” said state Sen. Julie Morrison, D-Deerfield, before the 43-15 vote. “Requiring a 72-hour waiting period is a commonsense reform that will help keep our neighborhoods safe.”

Another bill approved by lawmakers, HB-1465, heads back to the House to discuss changes made in the Senate. The measure bars the sale or transfer of assault weapons and attachments, .50-caliber rifles and magazines capable of holding more than 10 rounds to those under the age of 21. The Senate amendment modifies the language to grandfather the guns, magazines and accessories already owned by adults under 21 while the original House version would make any possession should the bill become law a criminal offense.

The third measure on the move, HB-1467, would make it illegal to sell, manufacture, purchase or possess devices described as bump stocks and trigger cranks. It also would allow municipalities to regulate or ban assault weapons. Like HB-1465, it also picked up a Senate amendment before passage 37-16 and returns to the House for a concurrence vote.

Local and national Second Amendment groups oppose the measures, as do many chamber Republicans, while gun control advocates support the legislation.

Gun dealer act veto

Also on deck in the chamber is a planned override vote of Rauner’s veto this week on a gun dealer licensing act.

“I wasn’t able to move to override the governor’s veto today, because the Senate has yet to receive his veto,” said Sen. Don Harmon, D-Oak Park. “Assuming we receive it by the time we return on April 10, I will move to override it, and I am hopeful that my colleagues will join me in making sure this commonsense measure becomes law.”

Harmon would have to pick up some political allies to make the move happen, however, as the rejected proposal only counted 30 votes on its first run through the Senate and would need to hit 36 for a three-fifths super-majority to pull off an override.

source: guns.com

19 Comments

  • Emilio

    we are completely against this measure or regulation that commits the 2nd. amendment..! It is an unequivocal measure that does not solve the massacres that occurred.

    Reply

    • glock 19 fan

      The expression “Safe like Chicago” comes to mind. With already the most oppressive gun restrictions yet and the murder rate continues to climb. In fact, shootings ***increase*** when more restrictions are enacted; they don’t decrease. The lawmakers fit one of the examples of insanity: they keep doing the same thing over and over and expect different results. Or at least they tell the voters that the results will be different. This time. BTW, was it Oak Park or Oak Forest that outlawed Swiss Army Knives? Talk about insanity!

      Reply

      • TJC

        We have a perfect example to follow to reduce gun violence and they ignore it. There is a small town in Georgia – a town of some 33,000 residents – where they require the head of the household to have a firearm. The town has a 2% crime rate and an even lower suicide rate. Let’s do what works – Not what makes politicians feel good!

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        • glock 19 fan

          Reminds me of the politician in the NRA ad calling for “what he can sell.” I think I’ll vomit.

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        • glock 19 fan

          Yes; Kennesaw looks like a great place to live! I Would be very interested if I didn’t already live in FL and have a paid-for house!

          Reply

          • TJC

            Fortunately here in Alaska we don’t have to require gun ownership – people do it out of good old common sense combined with a strong sense of self preservation.

          • Gregory A Foreman

            Yes, I’m in the same position here in Oregon. House paid for, but if things get really stupid, I will leave and moce to Arizona, where my brother is

  • Rick Vitti

    And how many of these shootings have been done by crazies that bought a gun and went on a rampage right away? Now how many of them were perpetrated by crazies that fully planned it all out, passed all the checks and balances that are already in place and when the red flags went up they were ignored by the great watchdogs of society. You demoncraps are just a bunch of ‘hey let’s make the peasants feel good by signing more do nothing laws”. They will like that and like sheep to the slaughter, they will keep voting us in until it’s too late. So laughable!

    Reply

    • glock 19 fan

      I still suspect that the crazies are being supplied (or being enabled) with guns to do their worst with. It even goes back to the Long Island RR shooting in the 90’s that the liberals spoon-fed to us on TV. Consider Orlando: that creep had money problems but he was cleared to buy a SIG rifle that sells for about $2000 or so (not an AR-15). Where did he get the money? I’m starting to lose count. The MSM told us about the LIRR massacre was somehow made possible for an unemployed NON-Citizen to travel to CA, spend 2 weeks in a motel, spend $300 for the pistol. So where did he get the money? In San Bernardino, who bought the weapons for the shooters? How about Columbine? Big money is behind this and the sooner we realize it the better.

      Reply

  • keith andrew bounds

    I am TOTALLY opposed to ANY and ALL “so-called” gun control!!

    Reply

  • oldwestman

    FFL’s are already paper worked to death by the feds, if the people who are supposed to enforce the laws already on the books would do their jobs this would all be unnecessary. Gov Rauner needs to step down as the leader of the GOP in IL. we need to elect more honest politicians than the ones we have.

    Reply

    • Corky Affolter

      there is over 20,000 laws already why do we need more. why not use the ones we already have, and all of these laws I’ve seen trying or passed will not stop another shooting !!!!

      Reply

  • John Spearman

    If they really want to stop crime then they need to once again they need to put criminals in prisions and stop treating them like children and send them to extra hard labor, take away the TV’s and sue the families to recover the cost for the victums as well as sue the NAACP end the free lawyers and free medical treatment. If a criminal commits a crime using a firearm then Life in prison with out the possibility of parole. Make it so hard on criminals that they won’t want to ever go back to the ROCK PILE.

    Reply

    • oldwestman

      Absolutely, positively, yes. Prison is not supposed to be a place to learn more criminal behavior while building your body. We need to take a book from some of the prisons overseas, if the criminals had to go to one of these they would never commit another crime if they ever did their time and got out. I have seen some of these prisons in person while over there and they are not fun places to be. Just seeing them would make you want to go straight. And prisoners have no rights whatsoever.

      Reply

      • Gregory A Foreman

        Wel, as is typical, some lame person came up with the idea that we havbe to reat criminals ‘humanely’ to reduce the recidivism rate

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  • Timothy Toroian

    OH yeah, really going to encumber criminals, especially those who get weapons delivered by Mexican cartels along with their drugs. They should look at the Chitown murder map that shows the concentration of murders and the neighborhoods that haven’t had a homicide in decades. It’s a gang and drug problem you simpletons!

    Reply

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